Black-Eyed Peas

I can’t think of a better way to ring in the New Year and anoint our new blog than with a recipe for Black-Eyed Peas. Peas and cornbread are a staple of the Southern kitchen.

I decided to try a new recipe this year, and it did not disappoint! Growing up, my Mother and Grandmother were amazing cooks. My Mom loved to throw different ingredients into a pot and hope it tasted good. In that spirit, I decided to try something new this year for our annual black-eyed peas.

Print Recipe
Black-Eyed Peas
Black-eyed peas and cornbread are a tradition in many households on New Year's Day.
Course Side Dish
Cuisine Southern
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5-6 hours
Servings
Ingredients
Course Side Dish
Cuisine Southern
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5-6 hours
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. I threw my hog jowls into a frying pan on medium heat. Once they started sizzling, I cooked each side for about four minutes.
  2. Since it took a few minutes for the skillet to heat up, I did a quick rinse of my black-eyed peas. Yes, I used dried peas. And the only "pre-soak" that happened was this minute rinse. I'm a rebel, y'all!
  3. After I finished rinsing and checking my peas, I threw some chopped bell peppers and red onions in with the hog jowl. My goal was to let the veggies get a good coat of that jowl juice but not get translucent.
  4. Throw your black-eyed peas, hog jowls, and veggies into a slow cooker. I used my 3-quart Crock-Pot. Make sure that you pour all of that jowl juice into the slow cooker! Then, I added the broth, water, salt, pepper, and olive oil. I do a 50/50 on my broth and water because I don't want my juice to taste like chicken and overpower the jowls. I turned it on high for three hours and (IMPORTANT STEP ALERT) did not take the lid off until the three hours was up.
  5. (Sorry y'all, I forgot to take a pic of this step.) After the three hours were up, I stirred in my green of choice. This year, we went with spinach. No fresh spinach, no frozen spinach. I used canned spinach, which I drained. After stirring in the spinach pretty well, I put the lid back on and left my slow cooker alone for another two hours, still on high. When I took the lid off, a wonderful aroma hit my nose and I was ready to dive in!
Recipe Notes
  • If you decide to pre-soak your peas, then cut your cooking times in half.
  • Use the green of your choice. We used spinach this year, but any green (mustard, collard, mixed) will work.

This was such a delicious recipe. I’m glad I decided to try something different for our black-eyed peas this year!

How do you cook your black-eyed peas?